Power without Scrutiny: The Jewish Privilege that Poisons Democracy

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by Tobias Langdon — The Occidental Observer June 22, 2018

Who is Ehud Sheleg? What is CFI? Nine out of ten British voters wouldn’t have a clue. Maybe ninety-nine out of a hundred wouldn’t. Their ignorance is very unhealthy, because CFI and Mr. Sheleg have enormous power in Britain. CFI have been controlling policies on immigration and other vital topics ever since 2010, when the so-called Conservative party won a general election against the so-called Labour party.

Two wings, one vulture

Before that, it had been LFI controlling policies on immigration and other vital topics. And what are CFI and LFI? Well, you might call them the two wings of one vulture: CFI stands for Conservative Friends of Israel and LFI stands for Labour Friends of Israel. Although the vast majority of Brits are not even aware that these organizations exist, one group is very aware: the traitorous political elite.

Aspiring prime minister Sajid Javid. Click to enlarge

You do not get to the top in British politics without getting very close to either CFI or LFI. The Jewish Chronicle has boasted that Conservative Friends of Israel is now “the biggest lobbying group in Westminster.” Under Tony Blair, the biggest lobbying group was Labour Friends of Israel. Ambitious politicians flock to join these organizations and there’s never any need to announce who the chief speaker will be at their annual dinners. As the Guardian pointed out in 2007, the chief speaker will be either the Prime Minister or the Leader of the Opposition. At least, that always used to be the case. But Jeremy Corbyn has threatened the tradition. As I’ve pointed out before, he isn’t in politics to become a millionaire, so Jewish money doesn’t interest him.

Iran vs Israel

But it certainly interests the Tories. And that’s where Ehud Sheleg comes in. Who is he? He’s an Israeli-born art-dealer with a British passport who is about to become Treasurer of the Conservative party, replacing Sir Mick Davies, former chairman of the Jewish Leadership Council. But Sir Mick will remain Chief Executive of the Tories. This is a very interesting situation. If people with strong Iranian or Russian connections held such important positions in the Tory party, would the British media have something to say about it?
You can bet they would. If Ehud Sheleg were an Iranian citizen called Mahmud Sharif instead, he would now be under very close scrutiny. Where do his true loyalties lie? That’s what the media would be asking. If an Iranian citizen had given hundreds of thousands of pounds to the Tories, as Ehud Sheleg already has, the media would ask whether the Tories were now pursuing Iran’s interests rather than Britain’s. Journalists would be crawling all over an Iranian treasurer’s past, probing his business interests, investigating his regular trips to Tehran and his meetings with Iranian officials, speculating about or exposing his connections with Iranian intelligence.

The dogs that don’t bark

And such scrutiny would be perfectly reasonable — indeed, the media would have a duty to investigate and speculate. If the Treasurer of the Tory party were an Iranian Muslim who still had strong ties to Iran, that Iranian Muslim might well try to influence government policy in favour of Iran. The media, as watch-dogs of the national interest, would have a duty to put him under very close scrutiny. But the Treasurer of the Tory party isn’t a Muslim called Mahmud Sharif. At present he’s a Jew called Sir Mick Davies who will soon be replaced by a Jew called Ehud Sheleg. And that makes all the difference. The British media have shown very little interest in asking questions about Jewish power in British politics.
I’m reminded of the Sherlock Holmes story “Silver Blaze” (1892), which is about a mysterious death and a missing race-horse. Fans of Arthur Conan Doyle will remember that this story contains “the curious incident of the dog in the night-time.” What was curious is that the dog did nothing. It did not bark at a criminal because it knew the criminal. Similarly, the British media are not barking at either Mick Davies or Ehud Sheleg. The media know the rules that apply to the ever-powerless Jewish community. Sycophancy directed at Jews is always acceptable, but scrutiny and criticism never are. What would happen to anyone who suggested that Mick Davies and Ehud Sheleg are fostering Israel’s interests rather than Britain’s? A lot. And none of it would be good.

For whom the Bell tolls

If you want to see what happens to those who challenge Jewish interests in modern Britain, take a look at the Guardian cartoonist Steve Bell. He’s a virtue-signalling liberal idiot, as his reaction to the Charlie Hebdo massacre clearly showed, but British Jews don’t object to his liberal idiocy. What they do object to very strongly is his criticism of Israel. After an Israeli sniper killed a young Palestinian female paramedic called Razan Al-Najjar in June 2018, Bell drew a pious cartoon in response. It portrayed the British prime minister Theresa May hosting the Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu at 10 Downing Street while an image of Razan Al-Najjar burns in the fireplace behind them.

Spiked Guardian cartoon of Razan al Najar. Click to enlarge

Bell then submitted the cartoon to Katherine Viner, the possibly Jewish editor of Guardian, who rejected it on the ground that it was anti-Semitic and equated Israel’s behaviour with that of Nazi Germany. He then took the highly unusual step of publishing the rejected cartoon and the email he sent to Viner in condemnation of her decision. It’s hard to disagree with what he said:
I cannot for the life of me begin to understand criticism of the cartoon that begins by dragging in ‘wood-burning stoves’, ‘ovens’, ‘holocaust’, or any other nazi-related nonsense. That was the last thing on my mind when I drew it, I had no intention of conflating the issues of the mass murder of European Jews and Gaza. It’s a fireplace, in front of which VIP visitors to Downing Street are always pictured (see page 12 of today’s Times), and the figure of Razan al-Najjar is burning in the grate. It’s a widely known photograph of her, becoming iconic across the Arab world and the burning is of course symbolic. She’s dead, she was shot and killed by the IDF [Israeli Defence Force] while doing her job as a medic.
I’m sorry you didn’t think it appropriate to talk to me yesterday, and I fear Katherine Butler [a deputy editor at the Guardian] bore the brunt of my outrage, for which I apologise to her, but forgive me for suspecting that the reason that you did not get in touch was because you did not really have an argument. The cartoon is sensitive, not tasteless, not disrespectful, and certainly contains no anti-Semitic tropes. It should have been published as it stands, but if you are still obdurate that it should remain unpublished, then I feel a duty to my subject to try and salvage something from this fiasco, and will resubmit it to you later this morning in a form that may get around some of the criticisms (to my mind wholly unjustified) that were made last night. (The Guardian censors cartoon in memory of Razan al Najjar: cartoonist Steve Bell respondsPublic Reading Rooms, June 2018)

razan-al-najjar

Bell’s cartoon clearly condemns the killing of Razan Al-Najjar and criticizes Benjamin Netanyahu and his ally, the shabbos shiksa Theresa May. Equally clearly, it is not in the slightest degree anti-Semitic and makes absolutely no reference to Nazism. But Steve Bell has been censored regardless: no version of his cartoon has appeared in the Guardian. The message is clear: “Thou shalt not challenge Jewish interests or criticize Jewish behaviour.”

See No Ehud

That’s why the killing of Razan Al-Najjar has been largely ignored by the British media. It’s also why the British media have largely ignored the important news about Ehud Sheleg. Yet another Jew has risen to the top of the Conservative party, but I’ve managed to find only two substantial references to Sheleg’s forthcoming appointment as Tory treasurer. One reference was in the Jewish Chronicle, which noted that “Mr Sheleg, who is now based in north London, is said to be a donor to several community [i.e., Jewish] charitable organisations.” The other reference was by the muck-racking political blogger Guido Fawkes, who takes his nom de guerrefrom the conspirator who tried to blow up the House of Commons in 1605. Guido’s blog exposed something that the rest of the media have ignored:
The new Treasurer of the Conservative Party is a director of seven companies which are late filing their accounts, Guido can reveal. Ehud Sheleg, who runs a Mayfair art gallery, is set to be appointed to the role after giving the Tories half a million pounds before the last election. Sheleg is a director of The Halcyon Gallery Ltd, Washington Green Fine Arts Group, Artica Galleries, Halcyon Fine Art Group Holdings, Washington Green Retail and Halcyon Fine Art Group Ltd, all of whose accounts were due last month and have not been filed according to the Companies House website. Another company of which Sheleg was a director, Goldend Ltd, was struck off after failing to file its accounts or confirmation statement on time. The six companies which are still active now face potential fines totalling thousands of pounds. Bodes well… (New Tory Treasurer is Director of 7 Companies With Overdue Accounts, Guido Fawkes, 21st May 2018)
The Guido Fawkes blog was once famous for its unruly and anarchic comments section. Five years ago the news-item above would have prompted lots of comments about Jewish power and Jewish control of the Tory party. And quite rightly so. But in 2018 one has to echo the Bible and say: “Ichabod!” (1 Kings, 4:21). The glory is departed from the Guido Fawkes blog. Like Breitbart and the London Spectator, it has purged its “anti-Semitic” commenters and imposed strict censorship on discussion of Jewish topics. You can ladle sycophancy on the Jews at those three sites, but you cannot subject Jews to any critical scrutiny, let alone suggest that they have harmed the Western world in any way.

Spiv and Take

But give Guido his due: although he hasn’t dared to name the Jew, he has dared to name the spiv. That’s a useful (if old-fashioned) British term for a crooked wheeler-dealer, particularly on the black market. Like muggers or rapists, spivs can belong to any race, but just as muggers and rapists are drawn disproportionately from the Black community, so spivs are drawn disproportionately from the Jewish community.
Under the shabbos goy Tony Blair, the Labour party’s chief fundraiser was a Jewish spiv called Michael Levy, who had made millions in the music business. Levy was at the centre of a scandal about Jewish and West-Asian businessmen buying honours from Labour. He escaped prosecution on a legal technicality, left his role as Labour treasurer, and was replaced by a Jew called Jonathan Mendelsohn. Then Labour were succeeded in government by the Tories and the part-Jewish David Cameronbecame prime minister. His money-man was a Jewish businessman called Andrew Feldman, who became Chairman of the Conservative party as Lord Feldman, serving first with the Muslim non-entity Sayeeda Warsi, then with the Jewish businessman Grant Shapps.

Sycophancy, not scrutiny

Are Jonathan Mendelsohn and Andrew Feldman spivs? I don’t know. But I do know that Grant Shapps is a spiv. He had to resign as Tory chairman after being accused of making large sums of money using disguise, trickery, plagiarism and testimonials from “people who seem not to exist.” Now the Jewish art-dealer Ehud Sheleg seems to be ready to put the “spiv” back into Conservative. Guido Fawkes has certainly suggested so, but he won’t dare to ask questions about Sheleg’s Jewish background and loyalty to Israel. Nor will anyone else in the mainstream media. All well-trained goyim know the rule: “Sycophancy, not scrutiny!”
One goy who certainly follows that rule is Tommy Robinson, the “Islamophobic extremist” who has been jailed for “contempt of court” while reporting on a Muslim rape-gang on trial in the Yorkshire city of Leeds. While constantly criticizing Islam, he has nothing but praise for Jews and has toured Israel as the guest of some Israeli supporters. That’s why White nationalists have criticized Robinson strongly as a Zionist agent and Judaeophile.

The World’s Most Important Question

But he gets many thumbs-up on the World’s Most Important Question: Is he “Good for the Jews”? Yes, some powerful Jews think that he is. Otherwise his arrest and imprisonment would not have won so much attention around the world. But many other Jews give him a thumbs-down on the World’s Most Important Question. The repulsive Blair-o-phile and Iraq-war fan David Aaronovitch, an influential journalist at the London Times, has decided that Robinson is not “Good for the Jews.” And that is the only criterion that matters to Aaronovitch:

Once, we’d have seen Mr Robinson coming

When Tommy Robinson makes anti-Muslim statements, we should be careful not to jump on board says David Aaronovitch. …
Do British Jews share Tommy Robinson’s view of Muslims as essentially unassimilable and alien? Because that it is what he thinks. Like [the Dutch politician] Geert Wilders … Robinson argues that Islam is itself an incorrigible religion, with religious intolerance, violence and misogyny at its scriptural heart. Its followers are therefore enjoined to be incorrigible too, and thus negative aspects of behaviour of some Muslims — female inequality, domestic violence, female genital mutilation, grooming gangs, jihadi terror, gender segregation, sectarianism and homophobia — are at the very least latent characteristics in all of them.
Robinson regards it at his crusade to open the eyes of a docile and over-tolerant majority to the demographic disaster happening all around them. That’s why he visits courts during ongoing trials to make films there, that’s why he used to tweet every single negative story that featured a Muslim in it (while leaving alone any other people’s infractions). The result is propaganda not dissimilar to what would happen if you took every bad story about Ultra-Orthodox Jews in Britain and then generalised from them. You want to talk about gender segregation? Gay rights? Weird inward-looking schools? That’s Jews for you. …
Once the unassimilable aliens were us. Once the Tommy Robinsons were warning about us. Once any self-respecting Jew with a sense of history would have seen a man like him coming. Now some don’t. Idiots. (Once, we’d have seen Mr Robinson comingThe Jewish Chronicle, 1st June 2018 / 18th Sivan 5778)
If David Aaronovitch doesn’t like Tommy Robinson, I think that’s a strong point in Robinson’s favour. Robinson has broken a strong Jewish taboo: he has criticized a sacred minority and stood up for abused White girls. And he may well lose his lifefor doing so. Like Gert Wilders, another Judaeophile who is risking violent death for opposing Islam, he may or not recognize the truth about the central Jewish role in Muslim immigration. If he does recognize it, he is saying nothing to expose it.

White Tide Rising

But clearly David Aaronovitch and many other Jews don’t like Robinson’s scrutiny of Muslim pathologies. They know that it is a dangerous step towards scrutiny of Jewish pathologies. Jews always want a buffer-zone of privileged minorities between themselves and the White goyim. When Whites tolerate bad behaviour by Muslims and other non-Whites, it soothes Jewish paranoia and reassures Jews about their own safety. That’s why Jews have been so insistent on minority worship. Whites must never criticize minorities or defend their own interests.
But Tommy Robinson has criticized a minority and tried, however imperfectly, to defend the interests of Whites. He might say that he includes Jews among Whites, but Jews like David Aaronovitch don’t believe him. And even if Robinson is a sincere Judaeophile, he is unleashing forces that Jews cannot control. More and more goys know which group has been the chief architects of mass immigration. I myself began to sense two years ago that the political tide had turned in favour of Whites. The big demonstrations in support of Robinson, like the rise of nationalist governments across Europe, confirm my optimism. The White tide is rising and the Jewish imperium is beginning to quake.

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One Comment Add yours

  1. ionellacatus67 says:

    Scrisoare deschisă către ambasadele din România ale Statelor Unite ale Americii, Franței, Germaniei, Olandei, Suediei, Finlandei, Norvegiei, Belgiei, Danemarcei, Canadei, Luxemburgului și Elveției: STOPați exportul de corupție!

    În calitate de deputat ales în Parlamentul României, îmi exprim deosebita îngrijorare cu privire la nivelul foarte ridicat al exportului de corupție dinspre țările dumneavoastră către alte state, inclusiv către România. Conform datelor oficiale (The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission – Enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act), companii de renume din țările pe care le reprezentați afectează zeci de state ale lumii în care, pentru a obține beneficii financiare, oferă mită în valoare de sute de milioane de dolari. În total, doar din ce s-a investigat până acum, rezultă un cuantum de 4.902.913.195 de dolari. La această sumă se ridică nivelul MITEI date în străinătate (aproape CINCI MILIARDE de dolari)! Iar amenzile pe care le-au primit companiile care au dat MITĂ în alte state (în special în Europa de Est, Asia, Africa și America de Sud) totalizează 10.722.513.931 de dolari (aproape 11 MILIARDE de dolari), fără a lua în calcul și amenzile de zeci de MILIARDE de dolari primite de diferite bănci de renume din țările dumneavoastră!

    Iată doar câteva cazuri celebre de amenzi primite de companii din statele dumneavoastră pentru DARE DE MITĂ (infracțiune de #CORUPȚIE) în alte țări:

    – Siemens (Germania): amendă de 1,6 MILIARDE de dolari;

    – Telia Company AB (Suedia): 965 de MILIOANE de dolari;

    – VimpelCom (Olanda) 795 de MILIOANE de dolari;

    – Alstom (Franța): 772 de MILIOANE de dolari;

    – KBR / Halliburton (SUA): 579 de MILIOANE de dolari;

    – Teva Pharmaceutical (Israel): 519 MILIOANE de dolari;

    – Och-Ziff (SUA): 412 MILIOANE de dolari;

    – BAE (Marea Britanie): 400 de MILIOANE de dolari;

    – Total SA (Franța): 398 de MILIOANE de dolari;

    – Alcoa (SUA): 384 de MILIOANE de dolari;

    – Snamprogetti Netherlands B.V. / ENI S.p.A (Olanda/Italia): 365 de MILIOANE de dolari.

    …Desigur, ar trebui să adăugăm celebrul caz de rușinoasă ÎNȘELĂTORIE la nivel global: Volkswagen (Germania), scandalul „Dieselgate” – amendă de 14,7 MILIARDE de dolari!

    Ar trebui să ne referim și la cele 13 MILIARDE de euro pe care compania americană APPLE a… „omis” să le plătească în Irlanda.

    Și nu putem să uităm nici amenzile astronomice cu care au fost sancționate băncile care au generat criza economică și financiară mondială:

    – JPMorgan Chase (SUA): 5,29 MILIARDE de dolari;
    – Credit Suisse (Elveția): 5,3 MILIARDE de dolari;
    – Wells Fargo (SUA): 5,35 MILIARDE de dolari;
    – Deutsche Bank (Germania): 7,2 MILIARDE de dolari;
    – Bank of America (SUA): 8,5 MILIARDE de dolari;
    – BNP Paribas (Franța): 8,9 MILIARDE de dolari;
    – Bank of America (SUA, nouă amendă): 11,8 MILIARDE de dolari;
    – JP Morgan Chase (SUA, nouă amendă): 13 MILIARDE de dolari;
    – Bank of America (SUA, nouă amendă): 16,65 MILIARDE de dolari.

    În plus, ar trebui să ne spuneți și unde este în opinia dumneavoastră CORUPĂTORUL în celebrele dosare Microsoft și EADS, dosare instrumentate de nu mai puțin celebra Laura Codruța Kovesi, cea pe care cu toții ați lăudat-o sau chiar ați medaliat-o. Unde e CORUPĂTORUL din țările dumneavoastră?

    Reiau solicitarea de la începutul acestei scrisori: STOPați exportul de #CORUPȚIE! Companii de renume din țările dumneavoastră DAU MITĂ în alte țări, inclusiv în România. România NU exportă corupție! Statele dumneavoastră însă o fac! Și e vremea ca acest lucru să înceteze.

    Cu speranța că veți începe să luptați cu adevărat împotriva #CORUPȚIEI colosale din țările dumneavoastră, vă asigurăm de tot sprijinul nostru. România NU exportă corupție și este un model din acest punct de vedere. Puteți apela oricând la ajutorul nostru dacă întâmpinați dificultăți în eradicarea corupției de MILIARDE de dolari care a cuprins mult prea multe dintre companiile dumneavoastră de renume mondial…

    Iată, la final, și o listă mai lungă de amenzi pentru dare de mită în străinătate, din 2010 și până în prezent, cu mențiunea că NICIO COMPANIE ROMÂNEASCĂ nu se află pe lista RUȘINOASĂ a companiilor care CORUP alte state:

    2018

    Kinross Gold – The Canada-based gold mining company agreed to pay a $950,000 penalty to resolve FCPA violations arising from its repeated failure to implement adequate accounting controls of two subsidiaries in Africa. (3/26/18)

    Elbit Imaging – The Israel-based company agreed to pay a $500,000 penalty to resolve FCPA violations stemming from payments to consultants for purported services related to a real estate development project in Romania. (3/9/18)

    2017

    Telia – The Sweden-based telecommunications provider agreed to pay $965 million in a global settlement to resolve violations of the FCPA to win business in Uzbekistan. (9/21/17)

    Halliburton – The company agreed to pay $29.2 million and a former vice president agreed to pay a $75,000 penalty to settle charges related to payments made to a local company in Angola in the course of winning lucrative oilfield services contracts. (7/27/17)

    Michael L. Cohen and Vanja Baros – The former Och-Ziff executives were charged with being the driving forces behind a far-reaching bribery scheme that paid tens of millions of dollars in bribes to high-level government officials in Africa. (1/26/17) NOTE: Och-Ziff and other executives settled charges in 2016.

    Orthofix International – The Texas-based medical device company agreed to pay more than $6 million to settle charges that its subsidiary in Brazil used high discounts and improper payments to induce doctors under government employment to use Orthofix products. (1/18/17)

    Cadbury Limited/Mondelez International – The global snacking business agreed to pay a $13 million penalty for FCPA violations occurring after Mondelez (then Kraft Foods Inc.) acquired Cadbury and its subsidiaries, including one in India that proceeded to make illicit payments to obtain government licenses and approvals for a chocolate factory in Baddi. (1/6/17)

    2016

    General Cable Corporation – The Kentucky-based wire and cable manufacturer agreed to pay more than $75 million to resolve SEC and Justice Department cases related to improper payments to win business in Angola, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Indonesia, and Thailand. (12/29/16)

    Teva Pharmaceutical – The global generic drug manufacturer agreed to pay $519 million to settle parallel civil and criminal charges that it paid bribes to foreign government officials in Russia, Ukraine, and Mexico. (12/22/16)

    Braskem S.A. – The Brazilian-based petrochemical manufacturer agreed to pay $957 million in a global settlement for concealing millions of dollars in illicit bribes paid to Brazilian government officials to win business. (12/21/16)

    JPMorgan – The firm agreed to pay $264 million to the SEC, Justice Department, and Federal Reserve to settle charges that it corruptly influenced government officials and won business in the Asia-Pacific region by giving jobs and internships to their relatives and friends. (11/17/16)

    Embraer – The Brazilian-based aircraft manufacturer agreed to pay $205 million to settle charges that it violated the FCPA to win business in the Dominican Republic, Saudi Arabia, Mozambique, and India. (10/24/16)

    GlaxoSmithKline – The UK-based pharmaceutical company agreed to pay a $20 million penalty to settle charges that it violated the FCPA when its China-based subsidiaries engaged in pay-to-prescribe schemes to increase sales. (9/30/16)

    Och-Ziff – The hedge fund and two executives settled charges related to the use of intermediaries, agents, and business partners to pay bribes to high-level government officials in Africa. Och-Ziff agreed to pay $412 million in civil and criminal matters, and CEO Daniel Och agreed to pay $2.2 million to settle charges against him. (9/29/16)

    Anheuser-Busch InBev – The Belgium-based global brewery agreed to pay $6 million to settle charges that it violated the FCPA by using third-party sales promoters to make improper payments to government officials in India and chilled a whistleblower who reported the misconduct. (9/28/16)

    Nu Skin Enterprises – The Provo, Utah-based skin care products company agreed to pay more than $765,000 for an improper payment made to a charity related to a high-ranking member of China’s Communist Party in order to influence the outcome of a pending provincial regulatory investigation in China. (9/20/16)

    Jun Ping Zhang – The former chairman/CEO of Harris Corporation’s subsidiary in China agreed to pay a $46,000 penalty for violating FCPA by facilitating a bribery scheme that provided illegal gifts to Chinese government officials in order to obtain and retain business for the company. (9/13/16)

    AstraZeneca – The U.K.-based biopharmaceutical company agreed to pay more than $5 million to settle FCPA violations resulting from improper payments made by subsidiaries in China and Russia to foreign officials. (8/30/16)

    Key Energy Services – The Houston-based oil field services company agreed to pay $5 million to settle charges that it violated the FCPA as a result of payments made by its Mexican subsidiary to an official responsible for negotiating contracts at Mexico’s state-owned oil company. (8/11/16)

    Johnson Controls – The Wisconsin-based global provider of HVAC systems agreed to pay more than $14 million to settle charges that its Chinese subsidiary used sham vendors to make improper payments to employees of Chinese government-owned shipyards and other officials to win business. (7/11/16)

    Analogic Corp. and Lars Frost – The Massachusetts-based medical device manufacturer agreed to pay nearly $15 million to settle parallel SEC and DOJ actions after its Danish subsidiary acted as a conduit for distributors to funnel money to third parties in hundreds of highly suspicious transactions. Frost, the subsidiary’s CFO at the time, agreed to settle SEC charges and pay a penalty. (6/21/16)

    Akamai Technologies – SEC announced a non-prosecution agreement (NPA) with the Massachusetts-based internet services provider in which the company will disgorge more than $650,000 in profits connected to bribes paid to Chinese officials by a foreign subsidiary. Akamai promptly self-reported the misconduct and cooperated extensively with the SEC’s investigation. (6/7/16)

    Nortek – SEC announced a non-prosecution agreement (NPA) with the Rhode Island-based residential and commercial building products manufacturer in which the company will disgorge nearly $300,000 in profits connected to bribes paid to Chinese officials by a foreign subsidiary. Nortek promptly self-reported the misconduct and cooperated extensively with the SEC’s investigation. (6/7/16)

    Las Vegas Sands – The casino and resort company agreed to pay $9 million to settle charges that it failed to properly authorize or document millions of dollars in payments to a consultant facilitating business activities in China and Macao. (4/7/16)

    Novartis AG – The Swiss-based pharmaceutical company agreed to pay $25 million to settle charges that it violated the FCPA when its China-based subsidiaries engaged in pay-to-prescribe schemes to increase sales. (3/23/16)

    Nordion Inc. and employee – The Canadian-based health science company and a former employee agreed to collectively pay more than $500,000 to settle FCPA charges. Mikhail Gourevitch, an engineer, arranged bribes to Russian officials for drug approvals and received kickbacks in return. Nordion lacked sufficient internal controls to detect and prevent the scheme. (3/3/16)

    Qualcomm – The San Diego-based company agreed to pay $7.5 million to settle charges that it violated the FCPA when it hired relatives of Chinese officials deciding whether to select company’s products. (3/1/16)

    VimpelCom – The Dutch-based telecommunications provider agreed to a $795 million global settlement to resolve its violations of the FCPA to win business in Uzbekistan. (2/18/16)

    PTC – The Massachusetts-based tech company and its Chinese subsidiaries agreed to pay more than $28 million to settle FCPA cases involving bribery of Chinese government officials to win business. (2/16/16)

    SciClone Pharmaceuticals – The California-based pharmaceutical firm agreed to pay $12 million to settle SEC charges that it violated the FCPA when international subsidiaries increased sales by making improper payments to health care professionals employed at state health institutions in China. (2/4/16)

    Ignacio Cueto Plaza – The airline executive agreed to pay a $75,000 penalty to settle SEC charges that he violated the FCPA when he authorized improper payments to a third-party consultant who he knew could route portions of the money to union officials in the midst of a labor dispute. (2/4/16)

    SAP SE – The software manufacturer agreed to give up $3.7 million in sales profits to settle SEC charges that it violated the FCPA when its deficient internal controls enabled an executive to pay bribes to procure business in Panama. (2/1/16)

    2015

    Bristol-Myers Squibb – SEC charged the New York-based pharmaceutical company with violating the FCPA when employees of its China-based joint venture made improper payments to obtain sales. Bristol-Myers Squibb agreed to pay more than $14 million to settle charges. (10/5/15)

    Hitachi – SEC charged the Tokyo-based conglomerate with violating the FCPA by inaccurately recording improper payments to South Africa’s ruling political party in connection with contracts to build power plants. Hitachi agreed to pay $19 million to settle charges. (9/28/15)

    BNY Mellon – SEC charged the global investment company with violating the FCPA by providing valuable student internships to family members of foreign government officials affiliated with a Middle Eastern sovereign wealth fund. BNY Mellon agreed to pay $14.8 million to settle charges. (8/18/15)

    Mead Johnson Nutrition – SEC charged the infant formula manufacturer with violating the FCPA when its Chinese subsidiary made improper payments to health care professionals to recommend the company’s product to new and expectant mothers. Mead Johnson Nutrition agreed to pay $12 million to settle the case. (7/28/15)

    BHP Billiton – SEC charged global resources company BHP Billiton with violating the FCPA when it sponsored the attendance of foreign government officials at the Summer Olympics. BHP Billiton agreed to pay a $25 million penalty to settle the case. (5/20/15)

    FLIR Systems – SEC charged Oregon-based FLIR Systems with violating the FCPA by financing a “world tour” of personal travel for Middle East government officials who played key roles in decisions to purchase FLIR products. FLIR, which earned more than $7 million in profits from such sales, agreed to pay $9.5 million to settle the charges. (4/8/15)

    Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company – SEC charged Goodyear with violating the FCPA when its subsidiaries paid bribes to land tire sales in Kenya and Angola. The company agreed to pay $16 million to settle the charges. (2/24/15)

    Walid Hatoum / PBSJ Corporation – SEC charged a former officer at a Tampa, Fla.-based engineering firm with violating the FCPA by offering and authorizing bribes and employment to foreign officials to secure Qatari government contracts. Hatoum agreed to settle the charges, and PBSJ entered into a deferred prosecution agreement and must pay $3.4 million. (1/22/15)

    2014

    Avon Products Inc. – SEC charged the global beauty products company with violating the FCPA by failing to put controls in place to detect and prevent payments and gifts to Chinese government officials from a subsidiary. Avon agreed to pay $135 million to settle the SEC charges and a parallel criminal case. (12/17/14)

    Bruker Corporation – SEC charged the Billerica, Mass.-based global manufacturer of scientific instruments with violating the FCPA by providing non-business related travel and improper payments to various Chinese government officials in an effort to win business. The company agreed to pay $2.4 million to settle the charges. (12/15/14)

    Stephen Timms and Yasser Ramahi (FLIR) – SEC charged two former employees in the Dubai office of Oregon-based defense contractor FLIR Systems with violating the FCPA by taking government officials in Saudi Arabia on a “world tour” to help secure business for the company. The two employees later falsified records in an attempt to hide their misconduct. Both agreed to settle the charges and pay penalties. (11/17/14)

    Bio-Rad Laboratories – SEC charged the California-based clinical diagnostic and life science research company with violating the FCPA when its subsidiaries made improper payments to foreign officials in Russia, Vietnam, and Thailand in order to win business. (11/3/14)

    Layne Christensen Company – SEC charged the Texas-based water management, construction, and drilling company with violating the FCPA by making improper payments to foreign officials in several African countries in order to obtain beneficial treatment and reduce its tax liability. (10/27/14)

    Smith & Wesson – SEC charged the Springfield, Mass.-based firearms manufacturer with violating the FCPA when employees and representatives authorized and made improper payments to foreign officials while trying to win contracts to supply products to military and law enforcement overseas. (7/28/14)

    Hewlett-Packard – SEC charged the Palo Alto, Calif.-based technology company with violating the FCPA when subsidiaries in three countries made improper payments to government officials to obtain or retain lucrative public contracts. H-P agreed to pay $108 million to settle the SEC charges and a parallel criminal case. (4/9/14)

    Alcoa – SEC charged the global aluminum producer with violating the FCPA when its subsidiaries repeatedly paid bribes to government officials in Bahrain to maintain a key source of business. Alcoa agreed to pay $384 million to settle the SEC charges and a parallel criminal case. (1/9/14)

    2013

    Archer-Daniels-Midland Co. – SEC charged the Illinois-based global food processor for failing to prevent illicit payments made by foreign subsidiaries to Ukrainian government officials in violation of the FCPA. ADM agreed to pay more than $36 million to settle the SEC’s charges. (12/20/13)

    Weatherford International – SEC charged the Swiss-based oilfield services company with authorizing bribes and improper travel and entertainment for foreign officials in the Middle East and Africa to win business. Weatherford agreed to pay more than $250 million to settle cases with the SEC and other agencies. (11/26/13)

    Stryker Corporation – SEC charged the Michigan-based medical technology company with violating the FCPA by bribing doctors and other government officials in five countries to obtain or retain business and make $7.5 million in illicit profits. Stryker agreed to pay more than $13.2 million to settle the SEC’s charges. (10/24/13)

    Diebold – SEC charged the Ohio-based manufacturer of ATMs and bank security systems with violating the FCPA by bribing officials at government-owned banks with pleasure trips to popular tourist destinations in order to illicitly win business. Diebold agreed to pay $48 million to settle SEC and Justice Department cases. (10/22/13)

    Total S.A. – SEC charged the France-based oil and gas company for paying bribes to intermediaries of an Iranian government official who then exercised his influence to help the company obtain valuable contracts to develop oil and gas fields. Total agreed to pay $398 million to settle SEC and criminal charges. (5/29/13)

    Ralph Lauren Corporation – SEC announced a non-prosecution agreement (NPA) with Ralph Lauren Corporation in which the company will disgorge more than $700,000 in illicit profits and interest obtained in connection with bribes paid by a subsidiary to government officials in Argentina from 2005 to 2009. (4/22/13)

    Parker Drilling Company – SEC charged the worldwide drilling services and project management firm with violating the FCPA by authorizing improper payments to a third-party intermediary in order to entertain Nigerian officials involved in resolving the company’s customs disputes. Parker Drilling agreed to pay $4 million to settle the SEC’s charges. (4/16/13)

    Koninklijke Philips Electronics – SEC charged the Netherlands-based health care company with FCPA violations related to improper payments made by employees at its Polish subsidiary to health care officials in Poland. Philips agreed to pay more than $4.5 million to settle the charges. (4/5/13)

    2012

    Eli Lilly and Company – SEC charged the Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical company for improper payments its subsidiaries made to foreign government officials to win business in Russia, Brazil, China, and Poland. Lilly agreed to pay more than $29 million to settle the charges. (12/20/12)

    Allianz SE – SEC charged the Germany-based insurer with violating the books and records and internal controls provisions of the FCPA for improper payments to government officials in Indonesia that resulted in $5.3 million in profits. Allianz agreed to pay more than $12.3 million to settle the SEC’s charges. (12/17/12)

    Tyco International – SEC charged the Swiss-based global manufacturer with violating the FCPA when subsidiaries arranged illicit payments to foreign officials in more than a dozen countries. Tyco agreed to pay $26 million to settle the SEC’s charges and resolve a criminal matter with the Justice Department. (9/24/12)

    Oracle – SEC charged the California-based computer technology company with violating FCPA by failing to prevent a subsidiary from secretly setting aside money off the company’s books to make unauthorized payments to phony vendors in India. (8/16/12)

    Pfizer – SEC charged the pharmaceutical company for illegal payments made by its subsidiaries to foreign officials in Bulgaria, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Italy, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Serbia to obtain regulatory approvals, sales, and increased prescriptions for its products. Pfizer and recently acquired Wyeth LLC – charged with its own FCPA violations – agreed to pay a combined $45 million in their settlements. (8/7/12)

    Orthofix International – SEC charged the Texas-based medical device company with violating the FCPA when a subsidiary paid routine bribes referred to as “chocolates” to Mexican officials in order to obtain lucrative sales contracts with government hospitals. (7/10/12)

    Former Morgan Stanley executive – SEC charged Garth R. Peterson with secretly acquiring millions of dollars worth of real estate investments for himself and an influential Chinese official who in turn steered business to Morgan Stanley’s funds. He agreed to a settlement in which he is permanently barred from the securities industry and must pay more than $250,000 in disgorgement and relinquish his approximately $3.4 million interest in Shanghai real estate acquired in his scheme. (4/25/12)

    Biomet – SEC charged the Warsaw, Ind.-based medical device company with violating the FCPA when its subsidiaries and agents bribed public doctors in Argentina, Brazil, and China for nearly a decade to win business. (3/26/12)

    Noble Corporation executives – SEC charged three oil services executives with bribing customs officials in Nigeria to obtain illicit permits for oil rigs in order to retain business under lucrative drilling contracts. (2/24/12)

    Smith & Nephew – SEC charged the London-based medical device company with violating the FCPA when its U.S. and German subsidiaries bribed public doctors in Greece for more than a decade to win business. The company and its U.S. subsidiary agreed to pay more than $22 million to settle civil and criminal cases. (2/6/12)

    2011

    Magyar Telekom – SEC charged the largest telecommunications provider in Hungary and three of its former top executives with bribing government and political party officials in Macedonia and Montenegro. The firm and its parent company agreed to pay $95 million to settle civil and criminal charges. (12/29/11)

    Aon Corporation – SEC charged one of the world’s largest insurance brokerage firms with violations of the books and records and internal controls provisions of the FCPA. Aon agreed to pay $14.5 million to settle SEC charges and a $1.7 million criminal fine to the Department of Justice. (12/20/11)

    Siemens executives – SEC charged seven former Siemens executives for their involvement in the company’s decade-long bribery scheme to retain a $1 billion government contract to produce national identity cards for Argentine citizens. (12/13/11)

    Watts Water Technologies and Leesen Chang – SEC charged the company and a former vice president of sales for improper payments disguised as sales commissions by its Chinese subsidiary to employees at state-owned design institutes in order to influence design specifications that favored their valve products for infrastructure products in China. (10/13/11)

    Diageo – SEC charged one of the world’s largest producers of premium alcoholic beverages for making $2.7 million in improper payments to government officials in India, Thailand, and South Korea to obtain lucrative sales and tax benefits. Diageo agreed to pay more than $16 million to settle the case. (7/27/11) [Administrative Proceeding]

    Armor Holdings – SEC charged the Jacksonville, Fla.-based body armor supplier for illicit payments to United Nations officials to obtain contracts related to U.N. peacekeeping missions. Armor Holdings agreed to an SEC settlement of $5.7 million and a criminal fine of $10.29 million. (7/13/11)

    Tenaris – SEC sanctioned the global manufacturer of steel pipe products for bribing Uzbekistan government officials during a bidding process to supply pipelines for transporting oil and natural gas. Tenaris agreed to pay $5.4 million under a Deferred Prosecution Agreement, and paid a $3.9 million criminal fine. (5/17/11)

    Rockwell Automation – SEC charged the Milwaukee-based company for illicit payments made and leisure travel provided by a former subsidiary in China to state-owned enterprises that provided design engineering and technical integration services to influence contract awards. (5/3/11)

    Johnson & Johnson – SEC charged the New Brunswick, N.J.-based pharmaceutical company for bribing public doctors in several European countries to win contracts for their products and paying kickbacks to Iraq to illegally obtain business. J&J agreed to pay $70 million to settle cases brought by the SEC and criminal authorities. (4/8/11)

    Comverse Technology – SEC charged the New York-based company for its Israeli subsidiary’s improper offshore payments to government officials in Greece. (4/7/11)

    Ball Corporation – SEC charged the Colorado-based manufacturer of metal packaging for beverages, foods and household products for improper payments to employees of Argentina’s government in order to import prohibited used machinery and export raw materials at reduced tariffs. (3/24/11) [Administrative Proceeding]

    International Business Machines Corp. – SEC charged IBM for providing improper cash payments, gifts, and travel and entertainment to government officials in China and South Korea in order to secure the sale of IBM products. IBM agreed to pay $10 million to settle the SEC’s charges. (3/18/11)

    Tyson Foods – SEC charged the worldwide chicken manufacturer for making illicit payments to two Mexican government veterinarians responsible for certifying its Mexican subsidiary’s chicken products for export sales. Tyson Foods agreed to pay $5 million to settle SEC and criminal charges. (2/10/11)

    Maxwell Technologies – SEC charged the energy-related products manufacturer for making repeated bribes to Chinese government officials to obtain business from several state-owned entities. San Diego-based Maxwell agreed to an SEC settlement of more than $6.3 million as well as an $8 million criminal penalty. (1/31/11)

    Paul W. Jennings (Innospec) – SEC charged the CEO of Innospec for approving bribes paid to government officials in Iraq and Indonesia. (1/24/11)

    2010

    Alcatel-Lucent – SEC charged the Paris-based telecommunications company for using consultants who performed little or no legitimate work to funnel bribes to government officials and win contracts in Latin America and Asia. Alcatel agreed to pay $137 million to settle SEC and Department of Justice charges. (12/27/10)

    RAE Systems – SEC charged San Jose-based company for making improper payments to Chinese officials through two of its Chinese joint venture entities in order to obtain significant government contracts for sale of gas and chemical detection products. (12/10/10)

    Seven Oil Services and Freight Forwarding Companies – The SEC charged Panalpina, Pride International, Tidewater, Transocean, GlobalSantaFe Corp., Noble Corporation, and Royal Dutch Shell plc with widespread bribery of customs officials in more than 10 countries to receive preferential treatment and improper benefits during the customs process. (11/4/10) [Administrative Proceeding]

    ABB Ltd. – SEC charged the Swiss-based global provider of power and automation products for using a U.S. subsidiary to pay bribes to officials at Mexico’s largest power company as well as to pay kickbacks to Iraq to obtain contracts under the U.N. Oil for Food Program. ABB agreed to a $39.3 million settlement. (9/29/10)

    Alliance One and Universal Corporation – SEC charged two global tobacco companies for making more than $5 million in secret payments to curry favor with government officials in Thailand and around the world to illicitly obtain tobacco sales contracts. The companies paid $28.3 million to settle SEC and criminal charges. (8/6/10)

    Joe Summers (Pride International) – SEC charged a former manager at one of the world’s largest offshore drilling companies for authorizing bribes to government officials in Venezuela to extend drilling contracts and secure difficult-to-obtain receivables from the government following widespread strikes and civil unrest. (8/5/10)

    David P. Turner and Ousama Naaman (Innospec) – SEC charged a former business director at Innospec and the company’s third-party agent in Iraq for engaging in widespread bribery of Iraqi government officials to land contracts under the U.N. Oil-for-Food Program. (8/5/10)

    General Electric, Ionics Inc., and Amersham plc – SEC charged GE and two subsidiaries for illegal kickback payments made in the form of cash, computer equipment, medical supplies, and services to the Iraqi government in order to obtain U.N. Oil for Food Program contracts. GE paid $23 million to settle the charges. (7/27/10)

    ENI and Snamprogetti Netherlands BV – SEC charged an Italian company and its former Dutch subsidiary in a decade-long bribery scheme that included deliveries of cash-filled briefcases and vehicles to Nigerian government officials to win construction contracts. Snamprogetti and ENI jointly paid $365 million to settle SEC and criminal charges. (7/7/10)

    Veraz Networks – SEC charged the California-based telecommunications company for improper gifts and payments made to foreign officials in China and Vietnam to win business shortly after the company went public. (6/29/10)

    Technip SA – SEC charged the Paris-based global engineering company for bribing Nigerian government officials over a 10-year period in order to win construction contracts worth more than $6 billion. Technip agreed to pay $338 million to settle SEC and criminal charges. (6/28/10)

    Elkin, Myers, Reynolds, Williams (Alliance One) – SEC charged four former executives and employees at the global tobacco company now named Alliance One International for their involvement in the payment of bribes to government officials in Kyrgyzstan and Thailand. (4/28/10)

    DaimlerChrysler AG – SEC charged the Stuttgart, Germany-based automobile manufacturer for its repeated and systematic practice of paying bribes to foreign government officials to secure business in Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. Daimler paid $185 million to settle SEC and criminal charges. (4/1/10)

    Innospec Inc. – SEC charged the specialty chemical company for its widespread bribery of foreign government officials in Iraq and Indonesia to obtain and retain business. Innospec agreed to a $40.2 million global settlement with the SEC and other agencies in the U.S. and U.K. (3/18/10)

    NATCO Group Inc. – SEC charged the Houston-based oil field services provider for the misconduct of a subsidiary in creating and accepting false documents while paying extorted immigration fines and obtaining immigration visas in Kazakhstan. (1/11/10) [Administrative Proceeding]

    Liviu Pleșoianu,
    Deputat PSD – Parlamentul României

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